Reason Why UN Is Shunning Iran’s Role in the Yemen War

January 14, 2019

The United Nations Security Council has been alerted that the Iranian-backed Houthi militias in Yemen have breached the UN-orchestrated truce over 200 times in less than two weeks, since it came into effect as a part of the Stockholm peace dialogue.
The two clashing parties in Yemen’s civil war i.e. the Houthi militia and Yemen’s internationally acknowledged government reached a delicate truce agreement in December 2018. However, the UN was alarmed by the representatives from the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen that the Iranian-backed military groups have shown no hint of being ready to obey by the ceasefire. According to the detailed list submitted to the Security Council on 31st December, Houthi militia killed 23 people belonging to the coalition forces and injured around 163 in 268 assaults that took place between 18th December and 30th December.
In case the UN-orchestrated truce fails, Yemen would be at risk of a permanent “Hezbollahization” of the conflict. Iran has enforces the “Hezbollah model” favorably across the region, all in a united effort to undercut the Middle East. For instance, the Islamic Republics supposed connection to the militias fighting in Syria and Iraq, Hezbollah in Lebanon, and now the Yemen’s Houthis.
In January 2018, a UN panel resolved that Iran was breaching a UN Security Council arms ban of the Houthis by transporting missile parts and other necessary parts to the rebel group. From the start of the conflict, Houthi rebels have used tactics straight from the Hezbollah handbook. They placed themselves among Yemen’s poor civilian population, purposely terrifying entire community. Human shields have also become a tragic feature of Houthi’s strategy, as well as the use of child soldiers and it is supported by Iran.
Millions of Yemenis are still living under an area considered illegal by the UN. Hence, it’s high time that Iran’s role in the war to be taken seriously.

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