Yemen’s Warring Parties Would Concede to the Prisoner Swap Terms in Coming Days

January 24, 2019

Yemen’s conflicting groups are set to accept a key prisoner exchange within the next 10 days. With the UK government announcing £2.5 million of funding to strengthen and support the United Nations peace process in Yemen.

The prisoner exchange was first suggested during discussions in Sweden last month as a part of the confidence-boosting steps to press forward UN-led discussions between the Houthi rebels and the Gulf backed and acknowledged government. The UN is expecting that the swap would prepare the way for a solid truce deal in the diplomatic Red Sea city of Hodeidah that would observe both sides pulling out from the port city and transfer control to local authorities as well as to the UN monitors.

On 23rd January, Hadi Haig, who is heading the Yemen government delegation, stated that that he is presuming that the final endorsing of the prisoner exchange might take place “within 10 days” after discussions were held last week in Jordan.

The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) that is set to supervise the arrangement added that it hoped to see “progress” in the coming days and requested that the conflicting parties shouldn’t let the opportunity to elapse.

The aid group in a statement stated that it was arranging for the exchange by increasing their staff members, organizing medical support and arranging two planes that would be transporting detainees between rebel-held Sana’a and Sayoun, a town under the control of the government.

At the same time, the UK, guaranteed millions of pounds to help to brace up the plan, stating that the extra funds will boost the UN’s supervising mission on the ground level in Hodeidah and also along the ports of Salif and Ras Isa, providing a lifeline for food and supplies.

Foreign secretary Jeremy Hunt stated that the British government had made the decision as the accord reached out in Stockholm were the ideal chance of securing long term peace.

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